Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Picky Pick.


I love little picky pick meals. Small bites of complimentary flavors. Salty, sweet, sour, bitter, hot, cold, crispy, silky all in one meal. It's a very "un-American" way to eat. No I don't mean that eating small plates makes you a red commie bastard, although they are great for sharing. I'm just saying that the folks around here (especially in the rebel flag, gun rack, can-o-soup casserole baking, sweat pants wearin', feed bag regions) tend to want big ol' portions of one big, cheesy, gravy covered hunk-o-meat casserole and no, sharing ain't gonna happen with nobody dammit. You can have my deep fried, bacon wrapped, meatloaf crusted corn dog when you pry it away from my cold dead, bloated hands.

Okay, so I've had a thing or two to say about a lot of small plates restaurants in the past. I hate small plate places where there is barely enough to share and you pay out the ass without even getting close to being full (or even sort of satisfied). Thankfully the fad has died down a bit so things are starting to get back to normal. There are plenty of small plate (sushi, izakaya, dim sum, tapas) joints that make me happy. The people of Japan, Spain, and China do it the best in my opinion. Lots of small dishes for sharing and meals tend to last a while. Less of a shove sustenance down your throat while watching reruns of Mama's Family sort of behavior and more of a spend time with people you like and enjoy the taste and art of food sort of thing.

Speaking of small plates the other day I made a plate of Japanese and Chinese offerings (I forced them to hold hands and play nice). I don't own enough small plates for everybody so I combined a few dishes onto single medium sized plates. I hope you will forgive me. Warm sushi rice with seared sesame Pacific sockeye salmon (say that ten times fast) and wasabi furikake, spicy black bean garlic prawns, avocado with togarashi, and steamed pork and shrimp gyoza with ponzu and sweet soy dipping sauce. It was tasty. Everyone was happy. The end. xoxo

Seared Sesame Pacific Sockeye Salmon with Wasabi Furikake

4 4oz Pacific sockeye salmon fillets, skin on
3/4 cup soy sauce
1 tsp honey
1/2 tsp sesame oil
1 tsp rice wine vinegar
2 cloves minced garlic
1 scallion, sliced on bias (set sliced green parts aside)
wasabi furikake
vegetable oil

In a large bowl mix soy sauce, sesame oil, rice wine vinegar, honey, scallion whites, and garlic. Whisk together until combined.

Place the salmon fillets in the marinade and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Set a large skillet over medium high heat. Add enough veg oil to lightly coat the pan. Dry off the salmon fillets with a paper towel (reserving the marinade) and pan fry skin-side down for 3 minutes. Carefully flip the fillets and cook another minute. Remove to a plate and let rest.

Add the saved marinade to the pan and reduce until it reaches a glaze consistency (about 2-3 minutes). Brush the top of the salmon fillets with the marinade. Top with furikake of your choice (or crushed nori and toasted sesame seeds). Slice the fillets and serve over rice or salad. xoxo